Pickashirt Replaces Tasks of Traditional Tailors with AI Sizing Algorithm

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Pickashirt
has been supplying tailor made shirts and suits worldwide for over 10 years. Using a database of over 20,000 customers and their measurements, they have evolved an algorithm that can perform the calculations of the traditional tailor. This algorithm continues to learn with each new customer.

The art of tailoring dates to the early Middle Ages with custom, padded linen garments that were worn under heavy metal armor. The menswear tailor as we know it today has been in trade since the 1100s. A professional tailor understands body shapes and their corresponding measurements. They can often pick your measurements from just looking at you. They can spot a measurement that looks off and make highly educated judgements on how a garment should be made or adjusted. Achieving that perfect fit is a skill that develops with fitting thousands of customers over time.

“Just like a tailor does in his head, the algorithm can use a set of data points and make probability-based decisions on spotting errors or making allowances to a garment size,” explained Robert Bell of Pickashirt.

While the algorithm cannot guarantee a 100% strike rate, nor can a traditional tailor. Both make informed judgements that minimise the probability of a garment needing adjustments after the first make. Bell says the algorithm is more efficient and reliable.

“Nearly all of our new customers get a perfect fit first time. We have a small percentage of cases where a first time customer will need adjustments. This will always happen, but the algorithm minimises it,” says Bell. In these cases, Pickashirtworks with the customer to adjust the sizing until they are happy with the fit which can involve a free alteration or a remake. Once the customer’s profile is complete they can repurchase ongoing with a consistent fit. “We have excellent customer retention. Once the fit is perfected, they become a customer for life,” says Bell.


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